Blog & Information

Medical Spring and Legal Summer

Are you happy that winter is almost over and spring is around the corner? If you are organizing a list of things to do, like spring cleaning or working out to get the beach body, do not forget to add getting your CEUs to the list. And we have something to help you: this year IEO offers medical spring and legal summer of webinars. You can choose either of the packages for a discounted price of $65 or sign up for both! To learn more about our webinars, click here.

Medical Spring (expired)

March 7: Choosing the Right Path: Advanced Ethical Decision-Making for Interpreters by Manuel Higgenbotham

April 4: Five National Language Service Quality Measures by Izabel Souza

May 9: The Interpreter’s Elusive Quest to Maintain Register by Natalya Mytareva

Legal Summer (expired)

June 6: Vocabulary-Building Resources and Techniques for Court Interpreters by Ernest Niño-Murcia

July 11: An International Perspective – Family Law Terminology for Translators by Suzanne Deliscar

August 22: Immigration 101: An Interpreter’s Perspective by Francesca Samuel

To purchase separately, or learn about CEUs offered, click here. 

Top 7 Interpreter Education Online Blogs of 2016

Dear fellow Interpreters,

Thank you for your feedback, and constant support. In 2016, you were most interested in video remote interpreting, certificates for continuing education and certification, vicarious trauma, finding your niche, and webinars. Here is the list of the blogs that you considered most useful in 2016 (click on the title to read the article):

1. Rejuvenate Your Career!

It is an all too common feeling – you’ve worked hard to get where you are in your career and then, suddenly, it starts to feel a bit routine. So how do you revive both your career and your enthusiasm? There are many easy ways to accomplish a sense of job rejuvenation.

2. Do You Have a Niche?

In any profession, there is typically extensive training and a process for learning information and applying it. But what happens once you have completed the training and are a working professional with experience? Continuing education is something we have talked about before and will always rally for, but is there something else you could be doing to improve your client base and expand your market appeal?

3. The New Health Epidemic

You won’t hear about this on the news. You aren’t likely to encounter it on social media either. The epidemic sweeping the nation isn’t a new virus, or a rare re-surfacing of an old one. It is, quite simply, stress. That’s right, The World Health Organization has deemed stress the “health epidemic of the 21st century.” While work-life balance has always been a struggle, it has become increasingly necessary and yet nearly impossible to accomplish.

4. The Value of Webinars

It’s no secret that webinars have been a growing trend in every industry for a while now. Attending a live seminar or conference is obviously beneficial, as is taking an online training course. But a webinar speaks to the heart of our fast-paced and steadily increasing business world’s main need: “get it done now, and move on to the next task.”

5. Certificate vs. Certification for Interpreters: What’s the Difference? part 1

Being bilingual does not automatically indicate or equal the ability to interpret. Just as the needed skill sets for interpreting as compared to translating are remarkably different, a similar case can be made for bilingualism not being a sufficient guarantee of competency for one to work as an interpreter. This is particularly true for Heritage speakers.

6. Interpreting in Immigration Settings: Be prepared, don’t be swayed

When working on an immigration case, the last thing attorneys want to worry about is an interpreter who is not competent or professional. We asked an immigration attorney Leonid Garbuzov for his input on what makes a great immigration interpreter.

7. Q&A with Eliana Lobo on VRI interpreting

Q: What are some of the difficulties commonly faced by remote interpreters?

A: Challenges for the interpreter include managing the flow, enforcing the use of the pre-session (providers may already be mid-task or mid-conversation when the video connection brings up the image). Often, this leads to their wanting to have the interpreter jump in mid-sentence. The challenge is finding a way to enforce the use of the pre-session and have it be viewed as part of your customer service rather than insisting on having things proceed according to the interpreter’s wishes. Confirming language preference, confidentiality and the patient and provider name are all steps that are part of the pre-session, which leads to greater patient satisfaction. Finding your voice and having professional scripts to use in your delivery helps.

We love to hear from you! Help us provide you with more useful and relevant info in 2017, or simply share your experience: Services@InterpreterEducationOnline.com

Happy New Year! 

Q&A with Eliana Lobo on VRI interpreting

Q: What are some of the difficulties commonly faced by remote interpreters?Eliana Lobo Headshot

A: Challenges for the interpreter include managing the flow, enforcing the use of the pre-session (providers may already be mid-task or mid-conversation when the video connection brings up the image). Often, this leads to their wanting to have the interpreter jump in mid-sentence. The challenge is finding a way to enforce the use of the pre-session and have it be viewed as part of your customer service rather than insisting on having things proceed according to the interpreter’s wishes. Confirming language preference, confidentiality and the patient and provider name are all steps that are part of the Pre-Session, which leads to greater patient satisfaction. Finding your voice and having professional scripts to use it in your delivery helps.

Q: What are the differences between remote video interpreting for healthcare and remote video conference interpreting?

A: For healthcare, interpreting is meant to facilitate understanding and trust between parties. In a conference situation, accuracy and speed are the prized elements. Also, you will have a partner in the booth with you for conference interpreting, but not when you interpret in a hospital or clinic. Again, being able to manage the flow to insure accuracy and understanding are key elements for the healthcare interpreter.

Q:  How long does an average interpreting call last?

A: There is no average length of call, just like there is no average patient. Call can last as little as a couple of minute, because the onsite interpreter arrives and takes over, and they can last for several hours, depending on the nature of the encounter.

Q: How will VRI impact the profession in the coming years?

A: VRI is the fastest growing market segment for healthcare interpreting. Other sub-specialties in the interpreting world are also using VRI in growing numbers (court, social services, schools and conference centers). For interpreters working onsite, their work will become more challenging as the simpler requests will increasingly be shunted to the phone or video, leaving the difficult and challenging assignments to fill an increasingly larger proportion of the onsite interpreter’s daily schedule.

Q: Interpreting is interpreting, so why would it be important for a medical or legal interpreter to take a course on VRI or attend a webinar on the same topic?

A: The short answer is to improve one’s knowledge and therefore, competence. The longer answer lies in whether you consider yourself to be a professional interpreter or not. All professions require certification and continuing education. Doctors, nurses, teachers and lawyers, are all required to get certified and maintain their certifications by pursuing continuing education and working the minimum hours per year to keep their skill set and certifications in good order. Are you certified, or qualified nationally as a healthcare interpreter? Are you certified, or registered by your state’s Administrative Office of the Courts as a court interpreter? If so, you should be pursuing continuing education to maintain your credentials.

Did you know the video remote interpreting is the fastest growing segment within language services? Do you want to stay viable and well trained in best practice for the new employment opportunities? Then getting trained in new technologies is a great way to achieve your goals.

Click here to register for the webinar on What you Need to Succeed as a Remote Interpreter, presented by Eliana 

Interpreting in Immigration Settings: Be prepared, don’t be swayed

When working on an immigration case, the last thing attorneys want to worry about is an interpreter who is not competent or professional. We asked an immigration attorney Leonid Garbuzov for his input on what makes a great immigration interpreter. Below are some of his suggestions about what attorneys and judges expect from the interpreter.passport-315266_1280

  1. Be Prepared

Nothing is worse than an interpreter that comes unprepared. Always bring a pen, paper and a legal dictionary.  Brush up on your legal terminology.  Don’t be late and don’t schedule other assignments for the same morning or afternoon as your immigration hearing, as you never know how long you will be there.

      2. Learn Your Terminology but Don’t Be a Know-It-All

While you should not expect the attorney, immigration officer, or the judge to explain legal terminology, you have to be sure that you understand the subject matter.  One illustrative example from my experience was an interpreter who mistranslated a question about an immigrant’s potential ties with “guerrilla organizations”, and asked whether he ever belonged to a “gorilla organization”.  When in doubt, it is better to ask.  If you realize that a mistake has occurred, you have to notify the judge, hearing officer, or the attorney immediately, and explain and correct the mistake.

      3. Do Not Add or Take Away From What’s Being Said

Another mistake is when an interpreter tries to add personal comments in order to make the subject matter easier to understand.  While the hearing officer, the client, or the attorney may not always be clear, it is not the interpreter’s job to “second-guess” and help them.  In one instance, when a client of mine with a serious mental impairment could not respond to an immigration officer’s questions, the interpreter tried to tell him that he was answering incorrectly, and even attempted to suggest what the correct answer should be.  Such conduct by an interpreter is never appropriate.

       4. Be Confident

Finally, it is important to not get riled up and to keep a professional demeanor.  This is especially important when an attorney—particularly the one who speaks the same language as the client – decides to challenge the accuracy of your translation.  It is important to know that these challenges are not uncommon and that they do not necessarily mean that an interpreter made a mistake or a misstatement.  An interpreter must remain undeterred by these tactics, must keep his/her voice clear, and must continue to interpret to the best of his/her ability without being swayed by these challenges.    

By Leonid Garbuzov of Garbuzov Law Firm, PLLC, special for IEO

IEO offers a comprehensive course developed by professional immigration interpreters and immigration attorneys. Immigration interpreting presents unique sets of challenges and requirements, so it’s essential for any interpreter to learn the protocol and legal concepts to understand and succeed in this field.    

Deaf Awareness Week

love-683926_1920Today, we celebrate the start of International Week of the Deaf 2016. An initiative that launched in 1958 in Rome, Italy by the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD). Since then it has been celebrated annually by the Deaf community all over the globe.

Last week of September of each year sees a highly concerted move towards global advocacy and awareness. WFD aims to spread its message as widely as possible to ensure that its campaign is noticed through media coverage.

In honor of the Deaf Awareness Week, Interpreter Education Online (IEO), leading healthcare and legal interpreter training organization, is offering a special discount for ASL Interpreters. In partnership with CEUs on the GO, IEO offers courses that offer RID CEUs. And from now through September 25, 2016, ASL Interpreters will receive 20% off any course taken through IEO.

Contact us for a coupon!

Terminology Contest: Who’s the most proficient of them all?

Every day we post a medical or legal term of the day for our interpreters. If you are on Twitter, follow us and join for the contest: respond to our Term of The Day with your translation into your target language. ASL interpreters can record and post videos with interpretation of the term.

Those who will tweet the most number of term translations or ASL interpretations in the end of each month have a chance to win 30% discount off any of our single-topic courses or free access to any of our webinars!

 

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